Industrial Media Names Devon Hammonds SVP Development & Current Programming – East Coast

UTA-backed indie production group Industrial Media has hired veteran TV executive and four-time Emmy-nominee Devon Hammonds as its Senior Vice President, Development & Current Programming – East Coast to lead the company’s New York and Atlanta production hubs.

In her new role, Hammonds will provide day-to-day support for all production companies based at Industrial Media’s New York and Atlanta production hubs, including Matthew Galkin’s Fairhaven Films and Christina Douglas’ Momentum Content. Hammonds will report to Eli Holzman, Industrial Media’s CEO, and Aaron Saidman, the company’s president, who made the announcement Thursday.

“Devon has been our trusted colleague in this industry for years and we are thrilled that she will be joining the team leading our East Coast outposts,” said Holzman and Saidman in a joint statement. “She is an incredibly talented executive and leader with invaluable creative instincts. We are excited to continue our partnership with her in this new capacity.”

Related Story

Don Cheadle Launches Production Company, Inks First-Look Deal With Industrial Media

Hammonds previously worked with both Holzman and Saidman on A&E’s Emmy-winning documentary series “Leah Remini: Scientology & the Aftermath” which is produced by Industrial Media’s The Intellectual Property Corporation. The show has been nominated for another Emmy this year in the category of Outstanding Informational Series or Special.

During her tenure at A&E, Hammonds executive produced over 30 series for the network. She most recently served as Vice President of Development and Programming and was responsible for developing new non-fiction series, as well as overseeing a team of programmers and several current non-fiction series. She joined the network in 2012 as its Director of Non-Fiction and Alternative Programming and went on to serve as executive producer on A&E’s original series Shipping Wars, Wahlburgers and Nightwatch before being elevated to Vice President in 2015. As Vice President, Hammonds partnered with IPC to launch the Emmy-winning Leah Remini: Scientology and The Aftermath, in addition to Kids Behind Bars: Life or Parole in 2019.

Hammonds began her career as a producer working under Michael Davies on the game shows Studio 7 and Who Wants To Be A Millionaire.

“Rarely in this business do you have the good fortune to work with people who have the extraordinary combination of creative vision and business acumen that Eli and Aaron possess,” added Hammonds. “As a network executive, it made them the perfect partners and I’m grateful for the incredible opportunity to learn from the best and to help drive the future success of Industrial Media and all of our brands under their leadership.”

Separately, the company announced today the promotion of Industrial Media’s The Intellectual Property Corporation’s development executive, Matt Zien, to the dual roles of Vice President of Development & Creative Director for IPC and Head of Brand Development for Industrial Media. Additionally, Patrick Murphy has been elevated to the role of Manager of Development for IPC.

Zien worked with Holzman and Saidman at All3 Media America and followed them as part of IPC’s launch team.  As a development executive, Zien is credited with helping shape many of the company’s notable series such as Adam McKay’s This Giant Beast That Is the Global Economy and Amazon Prime’s Free Meek. In his newly expanded role, he will continue to develop and shepherd new series and features for IPC while performing strategic brand development work at the Industrial Media level across all the group companies.

Murphy joined IPC in 2016 after the company’s launch. While with IPC, he developed an upcoming project at E! and spearheaded creative on projects set up at Apple, Discovery, and History. In his new role, he will also work across the company’s scripted slate, which includes the recently announced HBO series Dirty Thirty with executive producer Courtney Kemp.

Source: Read Full Article