Skydivers narrowly avoid midair collision with two F15 fighter jets

A pair of skydivers in the UK cheated death when they narrowly avoided colliding with two US F15 fighter jets that were flying in their airspace, new video shows.

The parachutists, who have not been identified, were in free fall at around 120 MPH when the fighter jets rocketed past them, nearly killing them. One of the skydivers captured the video with a GoPro attached to their helmet.

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The pair had taken off from the Chatteris airfield in Cambridgeshire on April 17 of this year when the jets set out from the nearby Royal Air Force (RAF) base in Lakenheath, Suffolk, home to the US Air Force’s 48th Fighter Wing.

According to a report by the UK Airprox Board, the RAF receives a call every morning from the airfield, informing them of whether or not the airfield is active.

On that particular morning, the pilot had not been made aware that the airfield was active, and the jets took off.

According to the Sun, the jets were only traveling at 350 MPH, far below their maximum speed of 1,600 MPH. Still, the collision would have been enough to kill the skydivers instantly.

An investigation found that on the morning of the near-disastrous incident, the frequency at which the pilots communicate with air traffic control had become busy at the moment they were preparing to fly over Chatteris. By the time they had gotten through to the controller, it was too late.

At the moment the parachutists spotted the jets, “there was very little they could do to avoid the situation, having no control over their speed or direction whilst in free-fall,” according to the report.

The report classified the risk of collision as “medium.” However, an independent aviation safety expert told CNN that the distinction is “pretty serious.”

The Chatteris airfield refused comment when contacted by CNN.

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