Animal lover revives field mouse she found lying in her garden

Animal lover revives a ‘dead’ field mouse she found lying in her garden and releases it back to the wild in astonishing footage

  • Becky Ramsey, from North Wales, carries out compressions on the mouse 
  • Field mouse starts moving and is moved indoors to bring temperature up
  • After two hours Ms Ramsey is able to release the small mouse back into the wild

This is the incredible moment a woman revives a field mouse she found in her back garden and sends it back on its way.

Becky Ramsey had been at her home in North Wales when she noticed the motionless mouse, which has since been named Fighter, lying at the top of her garden. 

Desperate to help the defenceless creature, Ms Ramsey carried out compressions on the mouse for 10 minutes before she began to notice movement around its abdomen.

Becky Ramsey, from North Wales, noticed the motionless mouse, which has since been named Fighter, lying at the top of her garden.

Ms Ramsey carried out compressions with her thumb on the mouse for 10 minutes before she began to notice movement around its abdomen.

She filmed herself on July 29 holding the small mouse in the palm of her hand and using her thumb to begin compressions.

After ten minutes, the animal lover begins to notice movement and runs her fingers around the mouse’s body in an effort to get its circulation moving.

As the tiny creature begins to show signs of life, Ms Ramsey moves it near her fireplace and tries to bring its body temperature back to its normal state. 

The heartwarming footage also shows the mouse finally beginning to take its first steps after two hours and being released back into the wild.

Following her attempts Ms Ramsey said being an animal lover gave her ‘some of the greatest gifts in life’. 

Field mice: The most common mouse species in the UK

Field mice, which are sometimes referred to as wood mice, grow to around four inches (10cm) long.

The mice have sandy brown fur, a white to grey belly and large black feet while house mice are a greyer-brown.

Field mice, which are nocturnal, also have a long tail that is roughly the same length as their head and body.

They typically feed on seeds from trees but they also fruit, berries, nuts, snails, insects, and fungi. 

Unlike the house mouse, field mice store their food in nests and don’t generally live in residential areas unless there are open fields nearby.

The mice are typically hunted by cats, dogs, wild birds and foxes.

She said: ‘I started to do all I could around 5pm and after the 10 minutes of getting his heart going, I had him in the house with me for two hours until he was strong enough to go it alone. So it was around 7pm when I released him.

‘The mouse was found at the top of the garden and as I have a cat, I was convinced it was dead.

‘I’ve previously tried to do compressions on a mouse, vole and bird, even though everyone thought I was strange, but I’d never succeed to get their little hearts pumping again. But amazingly, this time it finally paid off! I couldn’t believe it. 

‘All those times people have laughed at me for sitting down and trying CPR for half an hour on each animal, actually worked.

‘I released the mouse in the hedgerow next to a field by my house. Lots of berries there for him to eat. 

‘Being an animal lover gives you some of the greatest gifts in life. Responsibility, friendship and respect.’ 

Field mice, also known as wood mice, are the most common mouse species in the UK and grow to around four inches long.

The mice have sandy brown fur, a white to grey belly and large black feet. By contrast, house mice are a greyer-brown and often stay inside buildings.

Field mice, which are nocturnal, also have a long tail that is roughly the same length as their head and body.


Ms Ramsey brings the field mouse back into her house and tries to bring its temperature levels back to normal and offers it some food

After two house, Ms Ramsey is able to restore the mouse’s strength and releases it back into the wild

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